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Paleo Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Chocolate and cookies. What more can I say?

Yield: About 2 Dozen

Ingredients

  • 1 c almond butter, freshly ground from the bulk section or homemade, but most definitely not jarred
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 c cocoa powder
  • 1/4 c chocolate chips (highest % cocoa, but NOT baking chocolate (bleh))
  • 2 t vanilla extract
  • 2T – 1/4 c sugar (optional)

Method

Preheat your oven to 350ºF.

In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients and mix until thoroughly combined. We have had a few comments about people trying to make these and they fell apart. We’re pretty sure that jarred almond butter is the culprit. The oil that separates on top is causing the dry texture. You must, must, must use freshly ground almonds, from the bulk/grind-it-yourself section of your grocery store. Or you can make your own with almonds and a few splashes of almond oil burred in the food processer.

Let’s carry on…

On a parchment lined (or silicone lined) baking sheet, portion out the cookie dough batter by the tablespoon. Use your clean hand to flatten the ball into the desired cookie thickness.

Bake for approx. 12 minutes or until the cookies are relatively hard to the touch.

80 comments

  1. Um…the bulk section of where? You can’t tell us how awesome this place is without actually naming it. D:

  2. I’m guessing its a bake at 350? Looking forward to trying these out! :)

  3. These did not turn out as I had hoped. Disintegrates when touched. Only makes about 6 medium sized cookies. Pass.

  4. did you use almond butter or almond flour?

  5. I found that these had a great taste but they were really dry. Maybe I should add an extra egg? I am just starting to bake and cook and I don’t know what would make the texture more moist. Suggestions?

  6. did you use almond butter? i’m not meaning to insult anyone but if at a glance you read it and use almond flour that would make a big difference. almond butter has so much oil in it it’s hard to imagine how it could dry out very much. if you did use almond butter then i’m stumped. let us know.

  7. I just made these and had the same problem. Not sure if i just overcooked them or not, but the consistency of the batter seemed pretty crumbly. I also am not very good with baking so I can’t offer any suggestions. Very tasty flavor though! Also made carbonara tonight and that turned out awesome…thanks!

  8. we will try to make these again and see if we can figure out what could be going on. we’ve already had them 2 or 3 times and they came out dense, moist and, chewy. stay tuned.

  9. 2nd batch out of oven and tasted tested while still warm. This time I made them with store-ground almond butter, and they are MUCH improved over the creamy almond butter from a jar. The dough looked grainier and coarser, but held together well with hand rolling and flattening.

    No problems transferring hot cookies to the cooling rack, and within minutes they were tested and approved by my husband. Will check on our preteen’s opinion tomorrow.

    So, I’ve tried it both ways: the store-ground almond butter is a necessity, and almond butter from a jar will NOT do (though I do think it made a prettier cookie).

  10. Anyone try making these with Justin’s Maple Almond Butter? That’s what I’m going to be working with. Any suggestions on making them less crumbly with this almond butter? Additional egg? More oil of some sort?

    Thanks!

  11. Just made these with homemade almond butter. They turned out great! If they had been too crumbly, I would have added some melted coconut oil.

  12. I made these using Trader Joe’s creamy almond butter (with sea salt) and they held together fine, but were VERY DRY. Any thoughts on how to moisten them up? Extra egg? store ground almond butter instead? I used a high % cocoa chocolate bar from Trader Joes chopped into tiny little flakes/chips.

    We also forgot to get/didn’t have any sugar so we put in a bit of agave (not even sure why I have that) In case that would make a difference.

  13. These were delicious. For those who are having them come out dry… maybe try cooking a little less time or a slightly lower temp. I added 2T of coconut oil for the taste/health and they were really moist.

  14. just tried making a batch. as reported crumbly. i’m going to try adding some more sugar and a bit of water next time. i didn’t put much sugar in and i imagine that might be the cause

    • i think we’ve deduced that it’s likely the type of almond butter you use–sugar content shouldn’t affect it, except taste, of course. other commenters have had success with adding some oil or an additional egg.

  15. I’ve made these twice now with no issues with dryness at all. My only problem is Lee likes them so much he keeps eating them and I don’t get any :(

  16. I added an extra egg and they came out with no dryness :)

  17. Just made these and mine also came out dry and crumbly even though I added some extra coconut oil.

    I used Valrhona dutch processed cocoa powder because it is what I had on hand. However I think the “dutch process” could be why they are dry. I will try again later this week with regular cocoa powder and see if that makes a difference.

  18. thanks sharon…maybe you’ll be able to solve the mystery for us!

  19. Yummmm!!! Thanks for the recipe!!

  20. So I have made two more batches this time using regular cocoa powder (non “dutched” alkaline). The result was a much richer chocolate flavor and a less chalky taste. And YES the cookies are not as crumbly and dry although they are still very delicate and far from chewy.

    Note: I used bulk—grind it yourself almond butter, added 2T of coconut oil, and used no sugar in all of my attempts.

    Next time I may try it with 2 eggs. I really want this recipe to work for me.

  21. You left these up on your homepage for too long. i was trying to put off making them knowing they would be so delicious. however i failed last night and made my first batch. they were insane-o good.

    side note – made it with 1 egg and had no dryness problems or crumble problems.

  22. hahahaha….sorry garrett. good to know a/b the egg. did you happen to use freshly ground almond butter too?

  23. I made these with hazelnut butter: divine! Thank you for such an easy recipe that has managed to blow “regular” cookies out of the water.

  24. My cookies crumbled. :(
    I think using the bulk almond butter is what makes a huge difference, they were all out at Whole Foods today. I will have to try again.

  25. Yum! The dough seemed way to dry so I added 1/4 cup agave. It helped immensely

  26. Forgot to say I used MaraNature Almond Butter. Way cheap at Costco.

  27. Elizabeth Matakiewicz

    Came out very crumbly. Needs something added or maybe less cocoa.

  28. Concerned. Still learning to bake Paleo. is chocolate considered paleo? Cocoa powder? Let me know and thanks. Tom

  29. I made these a couple of weeks ago. The flavor was good, and almost all of them transfered safely from the pan to the rack to a tupperware. However, they were VERY crumbly to eat – the size was small enough that they were basically two bites, which was good, since I was basically hoovering that second bite out of the palm of my hand. Like others, I used the Maranatha almond butter from Costco, so that could be the source of the crumbles. Thanks for the recipe.

  30. Tom,

    see our about page for info about our philosphy on “paleo” vs. “not paleo”.

    bottom line, we see it as a futile effort to get wrapped around the axle on what is and is not paleo, per se. since basically everything we have available today is not the same as it would be in paleolithic times…and therefore “not paleo” (we always use grass fed beef as just one example, even that’s not from paleolithic times of course)…we’re really just taking the principles of what the agents of disease that have come about in neolithic times are…and trying to avoid them as much as possible.

    simply put…this means sugar (fructose), grains, and omega 6 polyunsaturated fats.

    and these cookies do have two of those things. some sugar from the chocolate and omega 6 from the nuts. which is just another reason to see that just because it may be considered “paleo” doesn’t mean you can eat it without abandon…as is the case with nuts.

    but in the realm of being much better for you on a paleo-ish scale…these cookies fit the bill. as always, be mindful of what you’re eating. but it is not so realistic to eat zero sugar or zero n-6…and probably little reason to think that a moderate about is much worse for you than zero. after all, n-6 is an essential fatty acid…you do need a little. the problems come with the excess. (read: that it makes up most of the fat in the standard american diet…coupled with grains and sugar). grey area foods like cocoa powder aren’t staples anyway, and if they’re not squarely seen as a disease causing agent i listed, there is usually not much cause for concern. unless you’re simply trying to replicate paleolithic times. but that will be damn near impossible. i hope that helps.

  31. How many calories are in each cookie?

  32. Could you add butter or something to moisten these up? The ones with more chocolate chunks were less crumbly but most of them were dry would be really good if they were gooey…

  33. Crumble-free Confirmation:
    I’ve made this recipe twice. The first time, I used Trader Joe’s almond butter, and yes, the cookies were a sandy, crumbly mess. I just made them again tonight, and took the suggestion of grinding up my own almond butter in the food processor first. This batch was chewy & delicious, with no crumbling. Good thing this recipe doesn’t make *that* many cookies, since I’ve just eaten half the batch.

  34. thanks so much for the research patty!

  35. We made some with Trader Joe’s unsalted raw almond butter and they turned out well. We used some roasted almond butter from Costco for another batch and they were a little crumbly, but not terrible. I suspect that adding some more egg white or coconut flour may add stability without the carbs.

  36. I thought these were great! Mine also came out a little crumbly as well, but not too bad. All I had on hand was store bought almond butter. I think next time I may add some unsweetened applesauce for more moisture and/or egg whites.

  37. These cookies tasted great but were really thin. My dough was too runny to form into balls. Was I supposed to chill the dough first? Thanks.

    • we have deduced that you MUST use freshly ground almond butter in this recipe. stuff from the bulk/grind-it-yourself section, not the jarred kind where the oil separates on top. i believe that’s what causing issues.

  38. I’ve been perusing your website this morning, and it is FANTASTIC! I can’t wait to try out so many of these! Also, your verbaige cracks me up – “Upcycling is hipster speak for reusing your trash.”?!? LOL. Love.

    One serious question though – what do you recommend I use if I’m allergic to tree nuts? It takes Almond flour and butter out of the running for me, unfortunately. :( I might be out of luck on the almond butter (coconut, maybe?), but what about subbing the flour? Would oat flour work (knowing that it may take some of the paleoness out of it)?

  39. hey monica…thanks for the comment. we find that coconut flour is a bit…….difficult. proceed with caution for that one as a substitute for almond flour…you might get a dry, gritty crumble-mess with that stuff. we’re not very experienced with oat flour – not sure what a good sub would be…let us know if you come across anything…it’s going to be trial and error for sure. baking stinks like that.

    as for the almond butter though, in a recipe like this…you might be in luck. in one of our guest posts to Food Renegade I saw comments about substituting sunflower seed butter successfully for almond butter. have not tried it though so no guarantees :).

    • i’ve seen many people have success with sunflower seed butter as an almond butter sub. the only brand i’ve ever seen is called sunbutter.

    • I just made these with Sunbutter sunflower seed butter. They were successful from the standpoint that they were not crumbly and held together well. I substituted raw honey for the sugar, but would use more next time and perhaps some more chocolate chips. Overall a good treat from time to time.

  40. FYI, I haven’t tried this recipe yet but if something I baked were falling apart, that’d indicate to me I should use another egg, assuming there wasn’t an obvious solution like fresh-grinding the almond butter.

    I wouldn’t use sunflower seed butter much if at all. Too much omega-6. I am not that anal about my fatty acid intake but I find that if I’m getting mondo amounts of the wrong kinds of fats, my joints flare up and I generally feel crappy. Even without symptoms, though, lots of o6 isn’t great for you.

    I’ve done things with coconut flour and it seems dry. I’ve heard of blending coconut flour and almond flour. Also generally you need to compensate with more moisture in the recipe and particularly more eggs. Which the Keatleys here already know, just saying.

  41. i’m with you dana. but what is someone with a tree nut allergy to do when they want a darn treat? there is always that scale of values…n-6 vs. wheat? and it’s individual as you say…but if you are avoiding all industrialized oils and such…could sunbutter be a pretty minor indulgence in the scheme of things every once in a while? i think it could. i’ll post a couple MDA articles I remember below just as a disclaimer about the n-6 of sunflower seeds so that readers can determine if it’s a worthwile substitution for something they may have very occasionally.

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/nuts-omega-6-fats/
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/quick-guide-edible-seeds/

    maybe for someone with a tree nut allergy…a coconut flour treat with tons of butter and eggs for moisture could work? as long as there was no dairy allergy as well. she also didn’t say if it was all tree nuts…maybe there are some she could use and grind up – cashew butter would work and it’s not really a nut so maybe no allergies? that would be much lower in n-6.

    someone would surely point out that butter isn’t “paleo”. and this is exactly why that’s so frustrating. here is a perfect example that argues that butter would be better than a “paleo” friendly “nut and seed”. at least this idea is starting to get some popularity…just not by all commenters.

  42. Could you please tell a person in the UK what DIY almond butter is? Could I just process whole almonds? Thanks

    • i’d recommend roasting the whole almonds low and slow…200 degrees or so for about 30 minutes maybe more…check them for browning and they’ll probably start to crack a little. then just add them to the food processor. a little oil might be necessary (almond if you’ve got it or maybe melted coconut oil) to get them started. then just blend to desired consistency…smooth. that’s it.

      there should be lots of youtube videos and such to help as well.

  43. Thanks I will try that

  44. Have tried them now and they are lovely – just noticed you say yield 2 dozen – I made 8 – must watch portion sizes!!!!

  45. I just pulled these bad boys outta the oven!! Handed one over to my newly converted Paleo husband who replied in his best Tommy Boy impression, “Lukie like chocolate”…..they are a hit! I used coconut crystals in place of the sugar. It was my first time baking with them, and I’m happy with the result! Thanks for the great recipe!

  46. I made with the jar-kind, but the raw kind not the creamy. I took the bottom of the jar (pretty much no oil) and then added coconut oil to moisten, also sliced almonds. They look terrible but taste great. I licked the bowl, oops.

  47. oh, and 2 T honey in lieu of sugar, sooooo good. Thanks!

  48. hi! i’m anxious to try this recipe and read through all the comments, suggestions, etc. i noticed on your website you had a recipe for: maple-almond-snack-packs- would this be good to use as the “almond butter” you call for in your recipe above? (since that seems to be the culprit for the crumbling cookies). or do you have another suggestion/update to the recipe?

  49. I made these with a little adjustment of adding some cinnamon and using only 2 T of sugar. They turned out pretty good, however, not real sweet. Maybe more sugar or using brown and white sugar might have made them better.

  50. These are a family favorite that can be whipped up in no time. Have made these many times with no problems. Well, except that I should make at least a double batch!

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